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Real Estate Weekly | Medical building just what the doc ordered

Medical building just what the doc ordered

January 2009 Download PDF

On September 3, 2008, the new Critical Care Building at Geisinger Wyoming Valley (GWV) opened to patients. It is the most recent addition to the campus and the second project completed by Franis Cauffman Architects, the Philadelphia, PA-based firm that also designed the master plan for GWV in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. With this project, which adds 178,000 s/f to the medical campus, GWV now offers cutting-edge critical care capabilities and high-tech surgical suites equipped for every specialty; it is northeast Pennsylvania region’s most advanced healthcare center. Francis Cauffman’s master plan also includes the expansion of the Henry Cancer Center, which is under construction, and a new physicians’ office building.

“Francis Cauffman’s master plan is transforming Geisinger Health System’s Wyoming Valley campus from a community hospital into a comprehensive medical center,” explained James Crispino, president of Francis Cauffman. “The Critical Care Building is the core of this expansion. It contains services which greatly extend the capacity of the hospital, such as a new emergency department and trauma center, surgery suite, and intensive care unit. Other features of the master plan are new ‘centers of excellence’ including a heart hospital, which is already completed, and a caner center addition.”

The Critical Care Building (CCB) is a $60 million project that has increased the size of the medical center’s campus by nearly 50 percent. The CCB houses a new 32-bed emergency department, 12 new surgical suites, a rooftop helipad, and ample shell space to accommodate a new intensive care unit and inpatient beds.

The new emergency department includes 19 acute care suites, 3 trauma bays, and 10 Express Care beds to treat patients with less severe injuries and illnesses.

The 12 high-tech surgical suites are equipped for operations ranging from transplant and heart surgeries to minimally invasive procedures.

Patients will notice a larger, more comfortable waiting room as well as larger acute-care suites with privacy doors and more space for family members at the bedside.

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